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The North Face Canyonlands Tents Review

The North Face Canyonlands


Description
A light compact shelter for 1 designed for hiking, biking, kayaking or adventure travel, where size and weight are paramount.
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Weight
4lbs 2oz


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Reviews 1 - 5 (16 Reviews Total) | Next 5

Review Date
September 4, 2010

Overall Rating
 5 of 5

Value Rating
 5 of 5

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1.00 of 5, 1.00 votes

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Reviewed by: Pat Graham ,  Backpacker

Summary:
I have had this tent for about 7 years now. It has survived Philmont, an 8 day high desert trip in New Mexico, several multiday kayak trips in the Ozarks and at least several dozen weekend trips. It has held up well even in ferocious Oklahoma thunderstorms with 50 MPH winds. It is getting a little worn and I'm looking for a replacement. Tent takes wind pretty well, unless the soil is soft or you are on loose gravel. Take longer stakes!!! TNF v-stakes are light and strong, but short. Guy this tent out well and it will take most anything. It is NOT free standing and you must take time to guy it out well. No leakage issues for me.
I am 6'1 and there is plenty of room, though sitting up is a little tite. I use treking poles to support the unzipped door on the rain fly and make a sizable awning. If wind or rain comes up, just kick the poles out and zip up.
As others have mentioned, the vestible is small, but big enough for boots and a small daypack. Big packs will pond up the fly. Aand I have learned to ventilate with the 2 way zippers on the fly door when no rain is likely as this helps with the condensation. I have never had much condensation with this tent. I can attest to the difficulty of exiting when there is heavy dew or rain on the fly. You will get some water in the tent and on your head. The tent is called a 1 and a half. Don't know how you get half a person in, but I have put a fair amount of gear in with me. Like I said, I'm looking for another one. Hard to beat for backpacking and Kayaking.

Customer Service:
Have never needed customer service.

Similar Products Used:
Big Agnes Seedhouse I (too short for 6'1)
Mountain Hardware PCT


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Review Date
October 14, 2009

Overall Rating
 5 of 5

Value Rating
 4 of 5

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Reviewed by: Jollyprez ,  Backpacker

Summary:
I know this is no longer made, but they're still available so thought I'd help others similar to me.

I'm 6'3" 275 - and fit in this tent very well. I have two nights of rain, and stayed perfectly dry. Not a lot of wind, however.

Size is perfect, setup is easy (gold to gold, all else follows). I didn't notice much condensation on two very humid nights.

Vestibule proved more useful than expected - just arrange everything in a single row from foot to head and it all fits.

Pull out the back with an extra line, and you have more room on the back.

I did not have a problem reading at night, or finding enough room for my pillow and stuff below my feet in the tapered area.

Similar Products Used:
Bivvy sacks, Sierra Designs Tengu, Sierra Designs Flashlight.


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Review Date
September 10, 2004

Overall Rating
 4 of 5

Value Rating
 3 of 5

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3.00 of 5, 2.00 votes

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Reviewed by: Mtnscout ,  Backpacker

Summary:
I have been hauling around 2 versions of the Meteor Light for years now due to their weight and length. I am trying to downsize my weight factor all I can, so I wanted to get something lighter. I am 6'5", so my options are very limited, so I did alot of research on weight vs height ability and found that the Canyonlands JUST meets my needs. Trip to the Grand Canyon worked well, especially with the weight factor. Just big enough for me and some gear and boots. Setup is easy, once you get the hang of where to put your stakes. I advise putting 2 stakes right at the corners near your head. This gives you full bloom at the upper part of the tent.
Funny story last trip. Went up to Shining Rock NF in NC and we camped in a nested area of daddy long legs spiders. They crawled all over the fly all night and it was a little eerie. Glad we were not aracnaphobic.
Anyway, the Canyonlands is low on weight and is just bigger than a bivy, but it works for long-legs like me.
Happy trails
Mtnscout

Similar Products Used:
Meteor Lights
Walrus single fly


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Review Date
March 27, 2004

Overall Rating
 3 of 5

Value Rating
 4 of 5

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Reviewed by: DaveSwarthout ,  Backpacker

Summary:
I want to add to what others have said by saying that the tent worked fairly well for me with the following caveats. The one-pole design means the tent's interior walls come together in a fairly sharp vee above your head. I like to read before sleeping and this tent's design means my book is squished into the roof walls when lying on my back.
The other problem is the way the door opens. When condensate is present, which is impossible to prevent when the night air is colder than your body perspiration, there is no way to exit the tent without getting your arm wet or dumping droplets of water into it from the door flap. In addition, the poles pass through a sleeve. Even though I had no problem doing this, there is no reason that any tent should use this technology unless it is a tent used in very severe weather condition.
Otherwise, it is light, it sets up easily, and it works well enough, especially for the price I paid for it. (A 2002 model for $150.)


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Review Date
May 14, 2003

Overall Rating
 3 of 5

Value Rating
 3 of 5

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Reviewed by: Mark Bidleman ,  Backpacker , from Rochester, NY

Summary:
I've had this tent for a couple of years. I have used it for a total of about 20 nights and been through a few heavy rainstorms. It has performed very poorly and seems to be getting worse. The rain soaks through the fly and eventually drips into the tent. The water that collects on the fly is much more than can be accounted for from simple condensation. During one particularly heavy downpour the rain was actually penetrating the fly in fine droplets. With a full screen tent body there is no second layer of protection. I've noticed that the door panel seemed to suffer the most and soaks through faster than the rest of the fabric. I've sealed the seams and attempted to waterproof the fly a couple of times to no avail.

The fact that I didn't read this concern from other owners led me to believe that perhaps it was defective. I sent it back to The North Face to be replaced. They promptly sent it back saying no defect was found and I needed to seal the seams. Thanks, $10 in shipping and my precious time wasted.

When it isn't raining this tent is great. I love sleeping under the stars without fear of black flies. I'm 6'1 and there's enough room to stretch out and change fairly easily. The vestibule is large enough to store boots but nothing more. But in the NorthEast I can usually count on rain about every time I head out.

Customer Service:
Prompt and accessible but they don't live up to the quality I expect from the brand.

Similar Products Used:
Kelty Vortex 2
Sierra Designs Light Year CD


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Reviews 1 - 5 (16 Reviews Total) | Next 5

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